Articles

On the whole, the articles listed on this page relate to writing and storytelling.

In the first part, I created a list of articles I wrote that focus on writing a novel. Thereafter, I’ve created an alphabetical list of articles written by others. They have been collected over many years.

You are welcome to consider any of the articles listed below for publication in your website/blog/newsletter. Permission is granted to reprint for free with the resource box and byline intact (this information is placed at the bottom of each article).

To view the articles, just click on the article you would like to view and you will be taken to the appropriate page.

I am aware the list is long. So, please don’t get overwhelmed and close this page. Do take some time to view it. Scroll down the list (all entries have been placed in alphabetical order) and I’m sure you’ll find something of interest.

Friday, 22 March 2013 02:01

Let's Apply Some CPR to Our Storytelling

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Let’s Apply Some CPR to Our Storytelling This is always a good time of year in which to reflect on where we’ve been and where we are going. It is also the perfect opportunity to plan ways to infuse our storytelling with extra “life.” So, let’s give it some CPR. C stands for Content; P stands for Performance; and R stands for Relationship. What do I mean? Read this column article to find out. C stands for Content and it is time to look for ways to add life to our storytelling repertoire — our content. When was the last…
Leaders and Stories: Growing the Next Generation, Conveying Values, and Shaping Character How senior government practitioners can use their experience and leadership stories as mentors, coaches, teachers, and exemplars to help grow other leaders. A leadership generation in the public service will shortly pass the baton, but few freshly-prepared leaders are ready to run the next leg of the race. Coincident with a new administration, well over one-half of today’s senior federal executives are ready to begin the next phase of their lives. Retirement projections are notoriously imprecise. Yet, according to the Office of Personnel Management’s statistics and historical patterns,…
Friday, 22 March 2013 01:36

Living Stories

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Living Stories Stories when told by talented storyteller can become alive for the listeners and evoke vivid images in their minds as well as strong emotions. Well told stories can make people cringe in fright, cry tears of joy or sadness and motive the dullest person. Some stories can even take on a life of their own and come back to haunt you. This happened to me at least once. In the 1980’s I used to live in the city of Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Back then I was a drinking man and used to spend a lot of time in…
Friday, 22 March 2013 01:30

Life, Passion ... Deadline

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Life, Passion… Deadline The Conclusion of the 8-Part BRING YOUR NOVEL TO LIFE Series You’re ready to write the story of your life. You’ve put your heart and soul into it. • Your themes resonate with you, and they’re the core of the novel. • You’ve hidden them so well you’ll write a story, not a message. • You’re willing to write honestly, knowing you can’t please everyone, but you’ll reach the people who will understand YOU. • You’ve layered your story with subthemes that will make plotting easier, and will make the tale you’re telling richer. • And you…
Friday, 22 March 2013 01:26

Life After Rejections

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Life After Rejections As writers, rejection is a hand we have to shake often. When you are at the beginning of your freelance writing career, and receive rejections, it is hard not to turn up your eyeballs and wail. Here, you had written this wonderful article or poem, and no one appreciated you. Sniff! But if you are looking to be a working writer, get real. Experienced writers get rejections too. The difference is that they don’t shrivel up and die. They toss aside the rejection note with elan, or simple press delete on the keyboard. And then they write…
Letters of Reference – Writing Tips and Strategies In addition to standard letter-writing dos and don’ts, there are a number of basic guidelines that apply specifically to most situations related to the writing of letters of reference. These are usually more “situational” than “how-to” in nature. These reference letter guidelines are important to both note and apply, since writing letters of reference is always a somewhat tricky and delicate matter. That’s because they almost always affect the reputation and future of the writer or that of another person. The following tips and strategies apply primarily to the writing of letters…
Letters of Reference – Writing Power Phrases As a result of writing literally hundreds of letters of reference over the years, I am aware that there are certain common elements and approaches that are applicable to almost all such letters. If you look closely at most reference and recommendation letters you will notice that there are certain “types” of phrases that recur over and over again, throughout the various letters. These statement types can be grouped into three major categories: opening statements, assessment statements, and closing statements. These statements are the three key components of any letter of reference. If…
Let Them Rest! Overworked Phrases and Story Elements At one time, they were clever. That’s why clichés catch on. Problem is, by the time they do catch on, writers have to work harder to avoid them. When you attempt to describe something that’s flat, the first thought that comes to mind is probably “flat as a pancake.” Something that’s smooth? “Smooth as a baby’s bottom.” An ugly old theatre that puts on the best shows in town? “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” Advice for a jilted lover? “There are other fish in the sea.” As a writer, it’s…
Friday, 22 March 2013 00:52

Learning to Learn

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Learning to Learn Strange as it seems, during my 16 years as a student, not one of my teachers discussed how to learn. Are you as interested in learning as me? LEARNING IS NATURAL – BUT NEEDS YOUR HELP For humans, learning is as natural and as automatic as breathing. But that doesn’t mean there’s no benefit to thinking about it. In fact, research on learning is now advancing and important assumptions are being overturned or reinforced. BECOMING A MASTER Becoming expert is one important area illuminated by new research. Our time is called ‘the age of specialization’ because most…
Friday, 22 March 2013 00:49

Learning How To Write

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Learning How To Write As a student of Spanish, my goal was to think in Spanish. Skip the word-by-word translation so I’d have the necessary speed to speak and listen. I know words in Spanish that I’d be hard pressed to translate. Usually profanity, I confess. Chingow! For years my students here in China have studied grammar, and know it better than you or I. They read. They write. But speaking involves moving faster than that. In conversation, we don’t have time to write it first and make sure it’s all grammatically flawless, then read it aloud, perhaps after a…

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